goodtypography

goodtypography:

The Full Smashing Library (60+ eBooks + 1yr of free updates).

The devil people of Mightydeals knows that you’re the kind of person that going to be bored on summer, so  they know that you want to take advantage of your free time and improve your skills.

This is simple awesome, they have released the full library of Smashing Magazine with a discount of 55%. This ebooks will teach you photoshop, illustrator, theory of design, web design,wordpress, typography, copywriting, ios, android, javascript, user experience, and a lot more. If you want to become a killer machine of productiveness and awesomeness, maybe (just maybe) this deal is for you (and me).

I can’t show you the full library here in this photoset but you can check it here: http://bit.ly/1scGyzU

The deal only last a few days: http://bit.ly/1scGyzU

The Big Book of Font Combinations 
With so many amazing typefaces out there it is easy to lose hours exploring and pairing fonts to get the perfect design. The Big Book of Font Combinations changes all that.
This amazing resource streamlines your research by putting a working historical record of the most incredibly influential typefaces in graphic design history in your hands. This endlessly inspiring and time saving guide has been compiled by expert font lovers to help professional designers, students and hobbyists dig deep and discover great looking combinations of typefaces and fonts for any design projects.
Use the font combination examples from the BBOFC in your next project, or use them as a jumping off place to think about fonts in a new way. However you use it, this essential guide is bound to become your constant companion on your design journey.
This electronic version of the BBOFC is a 100% vector PDF. Searchable, indexed, and completely clickable and is perfect for an eReader. Filled with 370 packed pages of font combination ideas this essential eBook is normally $25, but this Mighty Deal makes the BBOFC available for only $13 - 48% off the regular price.
Simply put. It’s font-tastic!
Get it here: http://bit.ly/1nTCejS

The Big Book of Font Combinations 

With so many amazing typefaces out there it is easy to lose hours exploring and pairing fonts to get the perfect design. The Big Book of Font Combinations changes all that.

This amazing resource streamlines your research by putting a working historical record of the most incredibly influential typefaces in graphic design history in your hands. This endlessly inspiring and time saving guide has been compiled by expert font lovers to help professional designers, students and hobbyists dig deep and discover great looking combinations of typefaces and fonts for any design projects.

Use the font combination examples from the BBOFC in your next project, or use them as a jumping off place to think about fonts in a new way. However you use it, this essential guide is bound to become your constant companion on your design journey.

This electronic version of the BBOFC is a 100% vector PDFSearchable, indexed, and completely clickable and is perfect for an eReader. Filled with 370 packed pages of font combination ideas this essential eBook is normally $25, but this Mighty Deal makes the BBOFC available for only $13 - 48% off the regular price.

Simply put. It’s font-tastic!

Get it here: http://bit.ly/1nTCejS

Gothic and Old English Alphabets: 100 Complete Fonts (Lettering, Calligraphy, Typography).

Gothic — or black-letter script — was a principal model for printer’s types when printing was first invented. This impressive collection features 100 complete and royalty-free alphabets of Old English and Gothic typefaces: Blackstone, Dolbey, Germania, Caxton Initials, Munich Fraktur, and 95 more — with many lowercases, numerals, and punctuation marks.

Get it here:

USA: http://amzn.to/1cYceNU
UK: http://amzn.to/1cYcpIZ

The Essentials of Lettering: A Manual for Students and Designers by Thomas Ewing French.

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

See more details here: http://amzn.to/1ilsz2z

An Essay On Typography by Eric Gill.

An Essay on Typography was first published in 1931, instantly recognized as a classic, and has long been unavailable. It represents Gill at his best opinionated, fustian, and consistently humane. It is his only major work on typography and remains indispensable for anyone interested in the art of letter forms and the presentation of graphic information.

This manifesto, however, is not only about letters their form, fit, and function but also about man’s role in an industrial society. As Gill wrote later, it was his chief object “to describe two worlds that of industrialism and that of the human workman & to define their limits.”

His thinking about type is still provocative. Here are the seeds of modern advertising unjustified lines, tight word and letter spacing, ample leading. Here, too, is vintage Gill, as polemical as he is practical, as much concerned about the soul of man as the work of man; as much obsessed by the ends as by the means.

Get it here:

USA: http://amzn.to/1aaCEjL
UKA: http://amzn.to/1jWMQwL

Just My Type: A Book About Fonts by Simon Garfield.

Just My Type is a book of stories about fonts. It examines how Helvetica and Comic Sans took over the world. It explains why we are still influenced by type choices made more than 500 years ago, and why the T in the Beatles logo is longer than the other letters. It profiles the great originators of type, from Baskerville to Zapf, as well as people like Neville Brody who threw out the rulebook. The book is about that pivotal moment when fonts left the world of Letraset and were loaded onto computers, and typefaces became something we realized we all have an opinion about. And beyond all this, the book reveals what may be the very best and worst fonts in the world – and what your choice of font says about you.

Today we can imagine no simpler everyday artistic freedom than the pull-down font menu. Here is the spill of history, the echo of Johann Gutenberg with every key tap. Here are names we recognize: Helvetica, Times New Roman, Palatino and Gill Sans. Here are the names from folios and flaking manuscripts: Bembo, Baskerville and Caslon. Here are possibilities for flair: Bodoni, Didot and Book Antiqua. And here are the risks of ridicule: Brush Script, Herculanum, Braggadocio and Comic Sans. Twenty years ago we hardly knew them, but now we all have favourites. Computers have rendered us all gods of type, a privilege we could never have anticipated in the age of the typewriter.

Yet when we choose Calibri over Century, or the designer of an advertisement picks Centaur rather than American Gothic, what lies behind our choice and what impression do we hope to create? When we choose a typeface, what are we really saying? Who makes these fonts and how do they work? And just why do we need so many? What are we to do with Alligators, Accolade, Amigo, Alpha Charlie, Acid Queen, Arbuckle, Art Gallery, Ashley Crawford, Arnold Bocklin, Auriol Vignette Sylvie, Andreena, Amorpheus, Angry, and Anytime Now? Banjoman, Bannikova, Baylac, Binner, Bingo, Blacklight, Blippo, Bebedot Blonde, Beach House or Bubble Bath? (And how lovely does Bubble Bath sound, with its thin floating linked circles ready to pop and dampen the page?) There are more than 100,000 fonts in the world. But why can’t we keep to a half-dozen or so familiar faces? Or perhaps we should just stick to the classic Garamond, named after the type designer Claude Garamond, active in Paris in the first half of the sixteenth century, whose highly legible Roman type blew away the heavy fustiness of his German predecessors, and later, adapted by William Caslon in England, would provide the letters for the American Declaration of Independence.

Typefaces are now 560 years old. So when a Brit called Matthew Carter constructed the now-ubiquitous Verdana on his computer in the 1990s, what could he possibly be doing to an A and a B that had never been done before? And how did a friend of his make the typeface Gotham, which eased Barack Obama into the Presidency? And what exactly makes a font presidential or American, or British, French German, Swiss or Jewish? These are arcane mysteries and it is the job of the book to get to the heart of them. But it begins with a cautionary tale, a story of what happens when a typeface gets out of control.

Just My Type from Pentagram on Vimeo.

Get it here:

USAhttp://amzn.to/Lkl6GK
UKhttp://amzn.to/1dz5BX7

Check other books here: typographybooks.tumblr.com

Last Minute Gift for the Typophile Geek: 9 Typography books.

This humble blog began some months ago, until this date we have posted 9 wonderful books about lettering, typography and calligraphy. In case you forget the gift for your graphic designer geeky friend here is a recap of all the books featured here, a perfect gift for the typophile or the amateur designer avid of know more about this beautiful discipline (click on the name of every one to see more details):

  1. The Geometry of Type by Stephen Coles.
  2. Thinking With Type by Ellen Lupton.
  3. New Ornamental Type: Decorative Lettering in the Digital Age.
  4. Little Book Of Lettering by Emily Gregory.
  5. Helvetica and the New York City Subways System: The True (Maybe) Story.
  6. Type Matters! by Jim Williams.
  7. Hand to Type: Scripts, Hand-Lettering and Calligraphy by R. Klanten.
  8. Calligraffiti: The Graphic Art of Neils Shoe Meulman
  9. Scripts: Elegant Lettering from Design’s Golden Age

In case you want a light review of this books you can visit typographybooks.tumblr.com and see more details.

Have a Merry Christmas guys!

Scripts: Elegant Lettering from Design’s Golden Age

No one person ever invented an alphabet,” wrote Type-maven Tommy Thompson. Script typefaces were no exception. During the letterpress era they were in such great demand that many people “invented” them, and many others copied them. In some commercial printing shops, composing cases filled with scripts were stacked floor to ceiling to the exclusion of other type. Printers routinely amassed multiple styles of the heavy metal type fonts, each possessing a distinct twist, flourish or quirk, used to inject the hint of personality or dash of character to quotidian printed pieces. Fonts had names like Wedding Plate Script, Cursive Script, Engravers Script, Bank Script, Master Script, French Script, Stationers Semiscript and Myrtle Script — Myrtle? — there were countless others. They surfaced in Europe and America. And the exact same types in France, for example, could be found in Italian foundries with different names.

Scripts signaled propriety, suggested authority yet also exuded status and a bourgeois aesthetic. The wealthy classes couldn’t get enough fashionable scripts in their diet. Likewise, the nouveau riche embraced them too — maybe it helped them to appear even more wealthy. 

Seen in everything from wedding invitations and birth announcements to IOUs, menus, and diplomas, script typefaces impart elegance and sophistication to a broad variety of texts. Scripts never go out of style, and the hundreds of inventive examples here are sure to inspire today’s designers. Derived from handwriting, these are typefaces that are stylized to suggest, imply, or symbolize certain traits linked to writing. Their fundamental characteristic is that all the letters, more or less, touch those before and after. Drawn from the Golden Age of scripts, from the nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century, this is the first compilation of popular, rare, and forgotten scripts from the United States, Germany, France, England, and Italy. Featuring examples from a vast spectrum of sources—advertisements, street signs, type-specimen books, and personal letters—this book is a delightful and invaluable trove of longoverlooked material. 275 illustrations, 254 in color

USA: http://amzn.to/18ou7s9
UK: 
http://amzn.to/18F7HOd

Calligraffiti: The Graphic Art of Neils Shoe Meulman

Calligraffiti - The Graphic Art of Niels “SHOE” Meulman’ is an impressive publication that presents a large selection of typographic works by Niels Shoe Meulman arranged in a uniquely simplistic manner; every spread presents two interacting visuals on its opposing pages. This repeating duality makes this book much more than just a collection of the artist’s best work; it unveils the basis of all graphic art.

The print finish on Calligraffiti’s cover is particularly eye-catching. A strong white masthead made with custom lettering by Niels Meulman is pressed into thick, black stock. The white type is then finished with a cello glaze to maximise its shine and contrast. There’s no paragraph on the back cover explaining who Meulman is or what the book might include. Instead, you will find 12 of Meulman’s most interesting logotypes. This decision is somewhat unconventional, as it leaves the content of the book fairly unknown to the average reader. However, it lets the work do the talking and invites those who are curious to open the book for more.

Get it here:

USA: http://amzn.to/15wGYl1
UK: http://amzn.to/1f3gr4I

Hand to Type: Scripts, Hand-Lettering and Calligraphy by R. Klanten.

Hand to Type is a stunning compilation of hand-made and digital scripts that showcases the beauty of handwritten letterforms. The book features work by some of today’s most successful and original calligraphers and lettering artists. In addition to fonts and lettering using the Latin alphabet, it introduces artists who explore Cyrillic, Arabic, and Greek scripts.

The book’s rich visual examples are complemented by in-depth interviews with outstanding calligraphers and type designers conducted by editor Jan Middendorp. Hand to Type also offers a revealing glimpse into processes by which hand-made letters may be turned into digital files. Prominent guest authors introduce the workings of scripts with which many readers may be less familiar—from Arabic and Indian writing systems to the amazing scripts found in pre-war German schoolbooks and on Amsterdam pub windows.

You can buy this book here:

USA: http://amzn.to/1hpgkEL
UK: http://amzn.to/1hpgkEL